New Montrose/La Canada location at Fusion Wellness - Tuesdays Only

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Massage Therapy and Body Work

Trauma-Sensitive ​

Massage Services:​

  • MyoFascial Release (MFR*)
  • Myofascial Unwinding
  • Pregnancy/Pre-Natal
  • ​Deep Tissue/Sports
  • Lymphatic Drainage

Relaxation with myofascial release massage therapy

What Is MFR?

*What is MFR?

Myofascial Release (MFR) is a very effective hands-on interactive technique that provides stretching, compression and sustained pressure into restricted areas of fascia (connective tissue) in the body to eliminate pain and restore motion.

MFR is a form of structural bodywork based on osteopathy, which works on the body as a whole to allow the fascial system to return to its correct position, length and function.

Since the emotions are also stored in the fascia, releasing the tissue physically can often release emotions stored there from the original trauma. When the emotions connected with the original trauma are released, so are the holding patterns contributing to the current symptoms.

Tips to Enhance Your MFR Treatment Sessions

Please read the next section in advance of your first MFR appointment

Read Tips Now
Fascial connection between diaphragm, iliacus and psoas muscles

what is Fascia?

Fascia

A fascia(/ˈfæʃ(i)ə/; plural fasciae /ˈfæʃii/; adjective fascial; from Latin: "band") is a band or sheet of connective tissue, primarily collagen, beneath the skin that attaches, stabilizes, encloses, and separates muscles and other internal organs.


From John Barnes... 

Fascia is a specialized system of the body that has an appearance similar to a spider's web or a sweater. Fascia is very densely woven, covering and interpenetrating every muscle, bone, nerve, artery and vein, as well as, all of our internal organs including the heart, lungs, brain and spinal cord. The most interesting aspect of the fascial system is that it is not just a system of separate coverings. It is actually one continuous structure that exists from head to toe without interruption. In this way you can begin to see that each part of the entire body is connected to every other part by the fascia, like the yarn in a sweater.

Trauma, inflammatory responses, and/or surgical procedures create Myofascial restrictions that can produce tensile pressures of approximately 2,000 pounds per square inch on pain sensitive structures that do not show up in many of the standard tests (x-rays, myelograms, CAT scans, electromyography, etc.) A high percentage of people suffering with pain and/or lack of motion may be having fascial problems, but are not diagnosed.


Fascia: A Liquid Crystalline Matrix


Fascia Photo by Permission of Dr. JC Guimberteau

My experience has shown that much of what you and I were taught has been known to be obsolete for close to seventy years! Despite the fact that the information has been known to be outdated, it is still being taught in most medical, dental, and therapeutic schools, leading to the frustration of temporary results and a health care system on the verge of bankruptcy and collapse.

It is time to change and update our paradigm, which is a shared set of assumptions, a model of reality. Our society's model of reality is logical, but a terribly flawed and incomplete paradigm.

I hope to share with you the principles that I have developed from my own personal experience with pain and gleaned from patients from around the world over decades. We will explore an exciting new paradigm of the Myofascial system that is emerging and the important concepts of piezoelectricity, fiber optics, mechanotransduction, fluid dynamics, quantum physics, fractal geometry, complexity and chaos theory, and cellular consciousness.

Fascia plays an important role in the support and function of our bodies, since it surrounds and attaches to all structures. In the normal healthy state, the fascia is relaxed and wavy in configuration. It has the ability to stretch and move without restriction. When one experiences physical trauma, emotional trauma, scarring, or inflammation, however, the fascia loses its pliability. It becomes tight, restricted, and a source of tension to the rest of the body. Trauma, such as a fall, car accident, whiplash, surgery or just habitual poor posture and repetitive stress injuries has cumulative effects on the body. The changes trauma causes in the fascial system influences comfort and function of our body. Fascial restrictions can exert excessive pressure causing all kinds of symptoms producing pain, headaches or restriction of motion. Fascial restrictions affect our flexibility and stability, and are a determining factor in our ability to withstand stress and perform daily activities.

Learn More

There is a whole world of fascia to be discovered. To get started, visit John Barnes website here.

Find out more